thisistheverge:

US House passes CISPA
The US House of Representatives has just passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (HR 3523) by a vote of 248 to 168.

Welp.

thisistheverge:

US House passes CISPA

The US House of Representatives has just passed the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (HR 3523) by a vote of 248 to 168.

Welp.

thisistheverge:

Alexis Madrigal: The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Ruined Literature, Show Them This Chart - The Atlantic
Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. Well, that time never existed. 

thisistheverge:

Alexis Madrigal: The Next Time Someone Says the Internet Ruined Literature, Show Them This Chart - The Atlantic

Remember the good old days when everyone read really good books, like, maybe in the post-war years when everyone appreciated a good use of the semi-colon? Everyone’s favorite book was by Faulkner or Woolf or Roth. We were a civilized civilization. This was before the Internet and cable television, and so people had these, like, wholly different desires and attention spans. They just craved, craved, craved the erudition and cultivation of our literary kings and queens. Well, that time never existed. 
"We’ll get to the longer answer, but the short answer is that Google isn’t looking for the smartest, or even the most technically capable, candidates. Google is looking for the candidates who will best fit Google."

Very simple. Courtesy of GHacks, link to Lifehacker.

It’s much cleaner and user-friendly, in my opinion. Hopefully they stick with it.

world-shaker:

theatlantic:

Cloud-Powered Facial Recognition Is Terrifying

With Carnegie Mellon’s cloud-centric new mobile app, the process of matching a casual snapshot with a person’s online identity takes less than a minute. Tools like PittPatt and other cloud-based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online, whether it’s a profile image for social networks like Facebook and Google Plus or from something more official from a company website or a college athletic portrait. In their most recent round of facial recognition studies, researchers at Carnegie Mellon were able to not only match unidentified profile photos from a dating website (where the vast majority of users operate pseudonymously) with positively identified Facebook photos, but also match pedestrians on a North American college campus with their online identities. The repercussions of these studies go far beyond putting a name with a face; researchers Alessandro Acquisti, Ralph Gross, and Fred Stutzman anticipate that such technology represents a leap forward in the convergence of offline and online data and an advancement of the “augmented reality” of complementary lives. With the use of publicly available Web 2.0 data, the researchers can potentially go from a snapshot to a Social Security number in a matter of minutes

The Internet never forgets a face. Read more at The Atlantic

I was actually going to say this is terrifying, but don’t want to repeat.
But let’s be honest: This is terrifying.

world-shaker:

theatlantic:

Cloud-Powered Facial Recognition Is Terrifying

With Carnegie Mellon’s cloud-centric new mobile app, the process of matching a casual snapshot with a person’s online identity takes less than a minute. Tools like PittPatt and other cloud-based facial recognition services rely on finding publicly available pictures of you online, whether it’s a profile image for social networks like Facebook and Google Plus or from something more official from a company website or a college athletic portrait. In their most recent round of facial recognition studies, researchers at Carnegie Mellon were able to not only match unidentified profile photos from a dating website (where the vast majority of users operate pseudonymously) with positively identified Facebook photos, but also match pedestrians on a North American college campus with their online identities. 

The repercussions of these studies go far beyond putting a name with a face; researchers Alessandro Acquisti, Ralph Gross, and Fred Stutzman anticipate that such technology represents a leap forward in the convergence of offline and online data and an advancement of the “augmented reality” of complementary lives. With the use of publicly available Web 2.0 data, the researchers can potentially go from a snapshot to a Social Security number in a matter of minutes

The Internet never forgets a face. Read more at The Atlantic

I was actually going to say this is terrifying, but don’t want to repeat.

But let’s be honest: This is terrifying.